The Go-Giver | Book Review

The Go-Giver | Book Review

It’s not about you.  It’s about them.

Many top sales experts have advocated for some time that the days of using broadcast advertising and gimmicky sales techniques are behind us. This applies especially to complex professional services selling. To be heard you need to have great content and build great relationships with potential clients and referral sources. Business relationships are not built on the sales person’s personality, but instead are built on being a valued resource to your prospects and sources. Give first in order to receive. (<–tweet this!)

In The Go-Giver by Bob Burg (Endless Referrals) and John David Mann, the authors utilize a fable to effectively explain the “giving to get” sales model. Their business fable focuses on a man named Joe. Joe is a go-getter who did “a lot of going but not a lot of getting.” Throughout the fable, Joe learns “the five laws of stratospheric success” (first introduced in the authors’ previous book). In The Go-Giver, Burg and Mann expand on each of those five principles by bringing real stories about real people into the mix.

Five Laws of Stratospheric Success

  • The Law of Value: Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value than you take in payment.
  • Law of Compensation: Income is determined by how many people you serve and how well you serve them.
  • Law of Influence: Influence grows when one places a great importance on others’ needs.
  • Law of Authenticity: The most valuable gift to offer is oneself.
  • Law of Receptivity: In order to continue giving effectively, one must stay open to receiving.

The Go-Giver laws lead to a more satisfying career for professional sales people. Let’s face it: professional sales people, regardless of how successful or professional they individually are, receive a lot of baggage from the reputation created by some individuals in the industry. Following the laws of the Go-Givers can lead to a mindset change where they are genuinely making a difference to their prospects and clients through their efforts. As a result, they will find that they are more successful at closing business and being more fulfilled in their career.

To give one example, a colleague of mine knows that I like to learn about new tech productivity tools and apps. Therefore, in most of his communications with me, he passes along a tech tip that he’s come across. This makes a difference and I notice and appreciate the extra time that he’s taking to provide some value to me. Despite the considerable literature that exists on the “give first” sales model, especially working with referral sources, my experience is that those individuals that take the time to give first are still rare and indeed stand out. (<–tweet this)

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